Skip to main content

Find us on

facebook youtube flickr twitter itunes u logo

Upcoming Events  

cybersec awareness month

My Computer Ate My Data, Changed My Students' Grades and Stole My Money
OR
What all faculty need to know about securing their information
DCAL, 102 Baker Library
October 10 or 29, 2014

 

 

Recent Talks  

Radu Sion

Computation Privacy and Regulatory Compliance Mechanisms for the Cloud
Radu Sion
Stony Brook University and Private Machines Inc.
May 28, 2013

mechael youtube

Keynote: Securing IT in Healthcare: Part III
Patty Mechael
mHealth Alliance
May 16, 2013

 

Newsletter 

ists newsletter fall 2013

 

ISTS Information Pamphlet


2012BrochureCover

 

Institute for Security, Technology, and Society
Dartmouth College
6211 Sudikoff Laboratory
Hanover, NH 03755 USA
info.ists@dartmouth.edu

Data Assurance in Medical Sensor Applications

Project Summary

We expect that wearable, portable, and even embeddable medical sensors will enable long-term continuous medical monitoring for many purposes, such as patients with chronic medical conditions (such as the recently announced blood-sugar sensors for diabetics), people seeking to change behavior (e.g., losing weight, or quitting smoking), or athletes wishing to monitor their condition and performance. The resulting data may be used directly by the person, or shared with others: with a physician for treatment, with an insurance company for coverage, or by a trainer or coach. Such systems have huge potential benefit to the quality of healthcare and quality of life for many people.

Since the sensor data may be gathered through a patient's mobile device (such as a mobile phone), a wireless network, and the Internet, there are many opportunities for the sensor data to be tampered or otherwise inaccurate. How can we assess confidence in sensor data? How can we present that level of confidence, in context, with the sensor data? This project will develop methods to assess confidence in medical sensor data.

Last Updated: 8/4/11