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Sal Stolfo

Salvatore J. Stolfo Columbia University
A Brief History of Symbiote DefenseTuesday, October 31st
Rockefeller 003
5:00 PM

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Wanna See Something REALLY Scary?
ISTS Looks at the Dark Web on Halloween Night
Tuesday, October 31st
Sudikoff  045 Trust Lab (dungeon)
7:30 PM - RSVP
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Recent Talks

Dan Wallach

STAR-Vote: A Secure, Transparent, Auditable and Reliable Voting System

Professor Dan Wallach
Rice University
Thursday April 27, 2017
Carson L01, 5:00 PM

Ben Miller Dragos

Pandora's Power Grid - What Can State Attacks Do and What Would be the Impact?

Ben Miller
Chief Threat Officer, Dragos, Inc.
Tuesday May 2, 2017
Kemeny 007, 4:30 PM
Brendan Nyhan

 

 

 

Factual Echo Chambers? Fact-checking and Fake News in Election 2016.

Professor Brendan Nyhan
Dartmouth College
Thursday May 4, 2017
Rocky 001, 5:00 PM

Dickie George

 

Espionage and Intelligence

Professor Dickie George
Johns Hopkins University
Thursday May 11, 2017
Rocky 001, 5:00 PM

Dan Wallach

A Nation Under Attack: Advanced Cyber-Attacks in Ukraine

Ukrainian Cybersecurity Researchers
Thursday April 6, 2017
Oopik Auditorium 5:30 PM

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Institute for Security, Technology, and Society
Dartmouth College
6211 Sudikoff Laboratory
Hanover, NH 03755 USA
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HomeEvents >

Trustworthy Hardened Code

Wednesday, April 9, 2014 at 4:15pm
Steele 006
Greg Morrisett
Allen B. Cutting Professor of Computer Science and Director of the Harvard Center for Research on Computation and Society, Harvard University
Co-sponsored by ISTS and the Computer Science Colloquium

Abstract

Greg Morrisett
Greg Morrisett

Much of our computing infrastructure is still built using C and C++, in spite of overwhelming language-level problems that lead to security exploits. I will discuss a range of compiler-oriented techniques that researchers have explored to try and harden C/C++ code. In one corner, we have techniques such as Software Fault Isolation (SFI) that have low overhead, and guarantee to enforce a particular security policy. However, the SFI policy is relatively coarse-grained, and as such doesn't block important attacks. In another corner is the Secure Virtual Architecture (SVA) which enforces a fine-grained, object-level integrity policy comparable to type safety. However, SVA and related techniques can have high overhead for some code, and will generally break more programs than SFI. All of these techniques depend upon compiler transformations, optimizations, and/or analyses that could lead to a large trusted computing base (TCB). So I will also discuss recent research that helps to minimize the TCB via machine-checked proofs of correctness.

Bio

Greg Morrisett received his B.S. in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Richmond, and his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon. He served on the Cornell CS faculty from 1996 to 2004, and then moved to Harvard as the Allen B. Cutting Professor of Computer Science. He served in the position of Associate Dean for Computer Science and Engineering from 2007-2010, and currently heads the Harvard Center for Research on Computation and Society.

Morrisett has received a number of awards for his research on programming languages, type systems, and software security, including a PECASE, an ACM Fellow, an IBM Faculty Fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship.

He currently serves as co-editor-in-chief for the Research Highlights column of Communications of the ACM. In addition, Morrisett has served on the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study (ISAT) Group, the NSF Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Advisory Council, Microsoft Research's Technical Advisory Board, Microsoft's Trusthworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board, and the CRA Board.

Greg Morrisett ISTS
Photo credit: Juan Nicholls 

Slides from Greg Morrisett's talk on April 9, 2014

Pictures from Greg Morrisett's talk on April 9, 2014

Last Updated: 9/10/15