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Past Talks

Dr. Liz Bowman

Dr. Elizabeth Bowman
U.S. Army Research Laboratory
Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Information: Army Social Computing Research
Tuesday, December 5th
Haldeman 041 Kreindler Conference Room
4:00 PM

Dr. Fabio Pierazzi

Dr. Fabio Pierazzi
Royal Holloway University of London
Network Security Analytics for Detection of Advanced Cyberattacks
Tuesday, November 28th
Sudikoff Trust Lab (L045)
12:30 PM

V.S. Subrahmanian

V.S. Subrahmanian
Dartmouth Distinguished Professor in Cybersecurity, Technology, and Society
Bots, Socks, and Vandals
Tuesday, November 14th
Carson L01
5:00 PM 

Rand Beers

Rand Beers ('64)
Big Data, the Internet, and Social Media:  The Road to the November 2016 Election
Wednesday, November 8th
Haldeman 41 (Kreindler Conference Hall)
4:30 PM 

Fright Night Imge

Wanna See Something REALLY Scary?
ISTS Looks at the Dark Web on Halloween Night
Tuesday, October 31st
S
udikoff  045 Trust Lab (dungeon)
7:30 PM - RSVP
Space is Limited 

Sal Stolfo

Salvatore J. Stolfo 
Columbia University
A Brief History of Symbiote Defense
Tuesday, October 31st
Rockefeller 003
5:00 PM

Dan Wallach

STAR-Vote: A Secure, Transparent, Auditable and Reliable Voting System

Professor Dan Wallach
Rice University
Thursday April 27, 2017
Carson L01, 5:00 PM

Ben Miller Dragos

Pandora's Power Grid - What Can State Attacks Do and What Would be the Impact?

Ben Miller
Chief Threat Officer, Dragos, Inc.
Tuesday May 2, 2017
Kemeny 007, 4:30 PM
Brendan Nyhan

 

 

 

Factual Echo Chambers? Fact-checking and Fake News in Election 2016.

Professor Brendan Nyhan
Dartmouth College
Thursday May 4, 2017
Rocky 001, 5:00 PM

Dickie George

 

Espionage and Intelligence

Professor Dickie George
Johns Hopkins University
Thursday May 11, 2017
Rocky 001, 5:00 PM

Dan Wallach

A Nation Under Attack: Advanced Cyber-Attacks in Ukraine

Ukrainian Cybersecurity Researchers
Thursday April 6, 2017
Oopik Auditorium 5:30 PM

ISTS Information Pamphlet


2012BrochureCover

 

Institute for Security, Technology, and Society
Dartmouth College
6211 Sudikoff Laboratory
Hanover, NH 03755 USA
info.ists@dartmouth.edu
HomeEvents >

“Are People Basically Good?” – An Interweaving Story of Trust, Commerce, and Technology at the Long Tail

Neel Sundaresan, Senior Director and Head, eBay Research Labs
Thursday, November 12, 2009

Neel Sundaresan

Abstract

A Commerce website was born more than fourteen years ago just about the time the Internet was taking off. It boldly brought buyers and sellers together with the limited tools and technologies available then. It helped them conduct commerce without physically meeting each other but trusting each other with goods and money. A model for trust and social network was facilitated by technology through online commerce. The phenomenal growth and evolution of this site called eBay is filled with stories of man meets machine. In this talk we will discuss technical, economic, and social aspects of these stories at the “Long Tail” – a term that has become synonymous with eBay.

Bio

Neel Sundaresan is the head of eBay Research Labs and a Senior Director. His current areas of research interest includes Social and Incentive Networks, Trust and Reputation Systems, Machine Learning as applied to Recommender systems, Classification, Ontology, and Search. He joined eBay in 2005 as a Distinguished Research Scientist. Prior to joining eBay was a founder and CTO of a startup focused on multi-attribute fuzzy search and network CRM. Prior to this he was the head of the eMerging Internet Technologies group at the IBM Research Center. There he built the first XML-based Search Engine. He was one of the early leaders in building XML technologies including schema-aware compression algorithms, application component generators and pattern-match systems and compilers. He built the first RDF reference implementation as a W3C standard recommendation. He led research work in other areas like domain specific search engines, multi-modal interfaces and assistive technologies, semantic transcoding, web mining, query systems, and classification for semi-structured data. Prior to this he worked on C++ compiler and runtime systems for massively parallel machines and for shared memory systems and also on retargetable compilers, program translators and generators. He has over 40 research publications and several patents to his credit. He has been a frequent speaker at several national and international technology conferences. He has advised 2 PhD and several masters dissertations. He has a degree in mathematics and a masters in computer science and engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, and a PhD in computer science from Indiana University, Bloomington. His dissertation was on Modeling Control and Dynamic Data Parallelism in Object-Oriented Languages.

Last Updated: 4/21/10