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Institute for Security, Technology, and Society
Dartmouth College
6211 Sudikoff Laboratory
Hanover, NH 03755 USA
info.ists@dartmouth.edu
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Disruptive Technologies for Information Assurance

Abstract

Carl LandwehrToday's information systems and networks have been extraordinarily successful in bringing new capabilities to homes, businesses, schools, and governments. But society's eagerness to gain these capabilities at the lowest possible initial cost has led to systems that are vulnerable to a variety of attacks and provide relatively poor accountability for the information flowing through them. This talk will describe the background, motivation, and the current projects in a program of research that aims to improve both the defensibility of large scale systems and the accountability of the information flowing through them. The technologies involved cover a broad range, from techniques that support tying a computation to a particular silicon chip to assuring that routers are configured in accordance with specified policies to detecting and remediating memory corruption attacks to renewing the Internet. The talk will close with some speculation on how we might teach ourselves to build strong, extensible systems in the future.

Bio

Carl Landwehr received his Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering and Applied Science from Yale University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer and Communication Sciences from the University of Michigan, where he helped implement the MERIT packet-switched network. For many years, he headed the Computer Security Section of the Center for High Assurance Computer Systems at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he led numerous research projects to advance technologies of computer security and high-assurance systems. He chaired an international defense research committee concerned with trustworthy computing, founded IFIP WG 11.3 (Database and Application Security) and is also a member of IFIP WG 10.4 (Dependability and Fault Tolerance). He has received Best Paper awards from the IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy and the Computer Security Applications Conference. IFIP has awarded him its Silver Core, and the IEEE Computer Society has awarded him its Golden Core.

Dr. Landwehr is Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Security & Privacy magazine and is a member of the Advisory Board of the International Journal for Information Security. He has served on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing, IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, the Journal of Computer Security, and the High Integrity Systems Journal. He served on the computer science faculty at Purdue University, and he has taught courses on topics in computer science and information security at Georgetown, the University of Maryland, and Virginia Tech.

He is currently on assignment to the Disruptive Technology Office as a Division Chief responsible for funding research in cyber security. He previously served the National Science Foundation as coordinator of the Cyber Trust theme in the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate. He began his work at NSF while a Senior Fellow with Mitretek Systems (now Noblis); at Mitretek he also led support for several DARPA programs in Information Assurance and Survivability.