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Sal Stolfo

Salvatore J. Stolfo Columbia University
A Brief History of Symbiote DefenseTuesday, October 31st
Rockefeller 003
5:00 PM

 Fright Night Imge

Wanna See Something REALLY Scary?
ISTS Looks at the Dark Web on Halloween Night
Tuesday, October 31st
Sudikoff  045 Trust Lab (dungeon)
7:30 PM - RSVP
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Recent Talks

Dan Wallach

STAR-Vote: A Secure, Transparent, Auditable and Reliable Voting System

Professor Dan Wallach
Rice University
Thursday April 27, 2017
Carson L01, 5:00 PM

Ben Miller Dragos

Pandora's Power Grid - What Can State Attacks Do and What Would be the Impact?

Ben Miller
Chief Threat Officer, Dragos, Inc.
Tuesday May 2, 2017
Kemeny 007, 4:30 PM
Brendan Nyhan

 

 

 

Factual Echo Chambers? Fact-checking and Fake News in Election 2016.

Professor Brendan Nyhan
Dartmouth College
Thursday May 4, 2017
Rocky 001, 5:00 PM

Dickie George

 

Espionage and Intelligence

Professor Dickie George
Johns Hopkins University
Thursday May 11, 2017
Rocky 001, 5:00 PM

Dan Wallach

A Nation Under Attack: Advanced Cyber-Attacks in Ukraine

Ukrainian Cybersecurity Researchers
Thursday April 6, 2017
Oopik Auditorium 5:30 PM

ISTS Information Pamphlet


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Institute for Security, Technology, and Society
Dartmouth College
6211 Sudikoff Laboratory
Hanover, NH 03755 USA
info.ists@dartmouth.edu
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The Dark Side of the (Ubiquitous Computing) Force

Abstract

Ubiquitous computing has great potential. Its proponents argue that it could enable a whole new wave of "invisible" technology that fades into the background of our lives in the same way as the electricity and water grids. But as one of its inventors, Mark Weiser, noted, it requires "a very difficult integration of human factors, computer science, engineering, and social sciences."

In this talk I'll look at some of the things that could go wrong if computing environments are designed without an adequate consideration of human factors. In particular, what are the privacy implications of ubiquitous sensors and the storage and processing of several orders of magnitude greater quantities of personal data?

Bio

Dr Ian Brown is a research fellow at University College London and a senior research manager at the Cambridge-MIT Institute. His research is focused on public policy, information security and privacy, intellectual property rights and networking. At UCL he teaches undergraduate and masters courses on Communications and Networks, Information and Society and Information Systems. Brown takes an active part in network and security protocol development as a member of various Internet Engineering Task Force working groups. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce and a Member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies and the Association for Computing Machinery. He is on the advisory boards of Creative Commons UK and FIPR and the boards of Privacy International, European Digital Rights (EDRI) and the Open Rights Group. He also consults for organizations such as JP Morgan, Credit Suisse and the US Department of Homeland Security.